MobiCom 2018 / New Delhi, India / Oct-Nov, 2018
MobiCom 2018 / New Delhi, India / Oct-Nov, 2018
MobiCom 2018 / New Delhi, India / Oct-Nov, 2018
MobiCom 2018 / New Delhi, India / Oct-Nov, 2018
MobiCom 2018 / New Delhi, India / Oct-Nov, 2018
MobiCom 2018 / New Delhi, India / Oct-Nov, 2018

 

 Keynotes and Awards

 

  Keynote: Mukesh Ambani

Invited Keynote by Mr. Mukesh Ambani

Mukesh Ambani
Reliance Industries Limited
Tuesday, October 30, 9:45 - 10:30 AM

Abstract:

Reliance has become the first Indian company to record PBDIT of over US$ 10 billion with each of our key businesses - Refining, Petrochemicals, Retail and Digital Services achieving record earnings performance.

Substantial synergies, productivity gains and production growth in our energy and materials business has allowed us to perform at very competitive levels despite the uptrend in oil prices through the year.

We have established strong foundations in retailing and digital services business with world-class supply chain management and network infrastructure which will serve our customers well. It is very heartening to see the traction our service offerings are gaining, with discerning Indian consumers. The growing Indian market provides exciting opportunities to scale-up these businesses and maximize long-term shareholder value in the coming years.

About the Speaker:
Mukesh Ambani

Mr. Mukesh D. Ambani is the Chairman & Managing Director of Reliance Industries Limited. During his tenure of over 30+ years, Mr. Ambani has successfully led a diversified portfolio spanning across Energy (E&P, Petrochemicals, and Refining), Retail, Telecommunications/ Digital Services and Textiles to make Reliance India’s largest private sector enterprise.

Mr. Ambani is also associated with various organizations. He is a member of The World Economic Forum Foundation Board, Foreign member at United States National Academy of Engineers (NAE). Mr. Ambani is also a member of the Indo-US CEOs Forum, Chair of The British Asian Trust's India Advisory Council, International Advisory Council of The Brookings, McKinsey & Company International Advisory Council, Global Advisory Council of Bank of America, Business Council and London School of Economics' India Advisory Group. In India, Mr. Ambani is a member of the Prime Minister's Council on Trade & Industry and Board of Governors of the National Council of Applied Economic Research. He also serves as the Chairman of Board of Governors for Pandit Deendayal Petroleum University.

Mr. Ambani earned a B.E. from Institute of Chemical Technology (India) and pursued an M.B.A. from Stanford University.



  Keynote: Monica Lam

Keeping the Internet Open with an Open-Source Virtual Assistant

Monica Lam
Stanford University
Tuesday, October 30, 3:15 - 4:15 PM

Abstract:

Virtual assistants, such as Alexa, Google Home, and Siri, are revolutionizing our digital life. In the future, they will provide us with a uniform, fully personalized, natural- language interface to all our diverse data sources, web services and IoT devices. The virtual assistant will become a powerful platform as it sees all our personal data and has great influence over the services and vendors we use.

We propose a collaborative research effort to develop open-source virtual assistant technology, in concert with a commercially viable distributed infrastructure that safeguards users’ data privacy, supports interoperability, and promotes open competition.

To jumpstart this effort, we have developed Almond, a working open-source prototype of distributed virtual assistants. Almond lets users use natural language to share their data, IoT, and services with fine-grain control, while preserving their privacy by keeping data on their own devices. Almond also lets users issue advanced commands that monitor real-time events and connect multiple services together.

This research lays the groundwork for the creation of three key open, non-proprietary, collaborative virtual assistant resources: (1) Thingpedia, a repository of virtual assistant skills, (2) LUInet (Linguistic User Interface Network), a neural network that translates natural language into ThingTalk, a virtual assistant programming language, and (3) a Distributed ThingTalk Protocol, DTP, that supports sharing with privacy via cooperating virtual assistants.

About the Speaker:
Monica Lam

Dr. Monica Lam has been a Professor of Computer Science at Stanford University since 1988, and is the Faculty Director of the Stanford MobiSocial Computing Laboratory. She is currently leading the open Almond virtual assistant project. She has made significant contributions to the field of compilers for high- performance machines and open communication platforms for mobile computing. Her research has been widely adopted in industry, including two startups she helped found: Tensilica, a configurable processor core company and Omlet, an open mobile gaming social network company.

Prof. Lam is an ACM Fellow, has won ACM-SIGSOFT and ACM-PLDI best paper awards, and has published over 150 papers on compilers, computer architecture, operating systems, high-performance computing, databases, security, and HCI. She is an author of the ``Dragon Book'', the definitive text on compiler technology. She received a B.Sc. from University of British Columbia (1980) and a Ph.D. from Carnegie Mellon University (1987).



  Keynote: Kathleen M. Carley

The Science of Social Cyber-Security

Kathleen M. Carley
Carnegie Mellon University
Thursday, November 1, 9:00 - 10:00 AM

Abstract:

Social Cyber-security is an emerging scientific area focused on the science to characterize, understand, and forecast cyber-mediated changes in human behavior, social, cultural and political outcomes, and to build the cyber-infrastructure needed for society to persist in its essential character in a cyber-mediated information environment under changing conditions, and actual or imminent social cyber-threats. Social media and personalized data assistants are critical technologies that affect the ways humans navigate this space, interact and engage in discussions. The manipulation of these technologies affects human activities. The changing nature of interaction in the cyber-mediated information environment are creating new scientific and policy challenges. This talk will describe the nature, promise of and challenges in social cyber-security. The role of network science and AI in addressing these challenges is addressed. Key examples will be drawn from areas such as disaster response, state stability, and the distribution of false information.

About the Speaker:
Kathleen M. Carley

Dr. Kathleen M. Carley is a Professor of Computer Science in the Institute for Software Research, IEEE Fellow, and Director of the Center for Computational Analysis of Social and Organizational Systems at Carnegie Mellon University. She joined Carnegie Mellon in 1984 as Assistant Professor Sociology and Information Systems. In 1990 she became Associate Professor of Sociology and Organizations, in 1998 Professor of Sociology, Organizations, and Information Technology, and in 2002, attained her current role as Professor of Computation, Organization, and Society. She is also the CEO of Carley Technologies Inc. aka Netanomics.

Dr. Carley received SB degrees in Economics and in Political Science from M.I.T., and a PhD degree in Sociology from Harvard University. Dr. Carley’s research combines cognitive science, sociology, and computer science to address complex social and organizational issues. Her most notable research contribution was the establishment of Dynamic Network Analysis (DNA) – and the associated theory and methodology for examining large high‐dimensional time variant networks.

Dr. Carley is an IEEE Fellow. In 2018 she received the USGA Academic Award at GEOINT 2018 for her work on geo‐spatially enabled dynamic network analytics. She is the recipient of the Allen Newell award for research excellence. She has served as President of the North American Association for Computational and Organizational Simulation (2003‐2004) and of the Mathematical Sociology Section of the American Sociological Association (1999‐2000). She received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Sociology and Computers Section of the ASA (2001). In 2011 she received the Simmel Award for advances in the area of social networks from INSNA and became a senior member of the IEEE. She has served as a Task Force Member of the Defense Science Board and of Geographic Information Science Panel of the Strategic Command. She has served on multiple National Research Council panels including ones on the military, big data, geo‐spatial analytics, and the decadel survey for the social sciences and was a member of the DHS‐HSSTAC.



  Keynote: Peter T. Kirstein

The Early International Activities in the Arpanet, Its mutation into the Internet, and some further Regional Extensions

Peter T. Kirstein
University College London
Thursday, November 1, 3:05 - 4:05 PM

Abstract:

This talk will consider some of the activities involved in setting up the International Internet and its precursors. It will consider later efforts in promoting the technology in regions that it had not reached earlier. There will be consideration not only the technical development, but also the political climate which either encouraged or prevented its take-up. Moreover, the importance of personal networks at many stages of the story will be highlighted. I will consider why the first Arpanet service node was sited at UCL, how it grew to provide an international heterogeneous interconnection service until the late ‘80s, and how this differed from other European developments. This will include the governance put in place, the role of the Open Systems Interconnection rise and fall in Europe, and the growth of multi-agency support on both sides of the Atlantic. In parallel with the development of a UK-US service, an International Collaboration Board (ICB) was formed that fostered unclassified collaborations between certain European and American NATO defence departments. While the ICB was not very significant technically, how its success initiated broader US-European Internet extension will be described. Our emphasis on application services to the ‘90s will be outlined – message, directory, security and multimedia conferencing. Finally we will treat briefly the start of international networking in India around 1990, and the bringing the academics of Central Asia and the Caucasus into the Internet community.

About the Speaker:
Peter T. Kirstein

Dr. Peter T. Kirstein attended UCLA, received a BA from Cambridge, a PhD from Stanford and a DSc from London. He worked four years as an accelerator physicist at CERN, Switzerland, during which he spent six months at Dubna in the Soviet Union. Then he worked four years for the US General Electric Research Centre based in Zurich, Switzerland, concentrating on computer and communications technology. In 1967 he joined London U, becoming Professor of Computer Communications Systems in 1970, and setting up the Department of Computer Science at University College London (UCL). He set up the UCL node of the Arpanet in 1973. Unlike the Norwegian node, he provided a National service to the Arpanet connecting the fledgling academic network, and then other government sites in defence, fusion, space and the British Library. This was the only European project providing heterogeneous services to the US until the late ‘80s.

In parallel, he researched into implementation and development of all levels of the Internet protocols, the Open Systems Interconnecting ones, use of satellites and applications. This allowed him to support his UK-US services even though each community was initially developing differently. As the Europeans moved towards the Internet protocols, his activities migrated to directory services, security and multimedia conferencing as research and service. His recent research has concentrated on use of IPv6, IoT and security in applications.

The success of the DARPA satellite activity, involving several European countries, led to the formation of the International Collaboration Board. This fostered unclassified collaborations amongst NATO defence departments under his Chairmanship. The ICB led to the US National Science Foundation asking Kirstein to set up meetings with European academics., leading to much broader internationalization.

As part of a Review Committee of the UNDP, he was involved in steering the main Indian research institutes in IT to connect to each other and the Internet; this led to the early phases of ERNET. Later, on a NATO Science for Peace committee he advised on network facilities in the Caucasus and Central Asia. He proposed a Regional Network connecting their National networks to the European academic network. He became director of what is known as the SILK Project. As a result, these countries became eventually members of the academic Internet community.

He is a Fellow of many Learned Societies, including the UK Royal and US National Academies of Engineering, and the American Academy of Arts and Science. He has received many awards including becoming a Commander of the British Empire and receiving the Marconi, Postel and CompCom awards, and is an Internet Pioneer in the ISOC Hall of Fame.



  Athena Lecture: Andrea Goldsmith

The Future of Wireless and What it will Enable

Andrea Goldsmith
Stanford University
Wednesday, October 31, 9:00-10:00 AM

Abstract:

Wireless technology has enormous potential to change the way we live, work, and play over the next several decades. Future wireless networks will support 100 Gbps communication between people, devices, and the “Internet of Things,” with high reliability and uniform coverage indoors and out. The shortage of spectrum to support such systems will be alleviated by advances in massive MIMO and mmW technology as well as cognitive radios. Wireless technology will also enable smart and energy-efficient homes and buildings, automated highways and skyways, and in-body networks for monitoring, analysis and treatment of medical conditions. Breakthrough energy-efficiency architectures, algorithms and hardware will allow wireless networks to be powered by tiny batteries, energy-harvesting, or over-the-air power transfer. Finally, new communication systems based on biology and chemistry to encode bits will enable a wide range of new micro and macroscale applications. There are many technical challenges that must be overcome in order to make this vision a reality. This talk will describe what the wireless future might look like along with some of the innovations and breakthroughs required to realize this vision.

About the Speaker:
Peter T. Kirstein

Dr. Andrea Goldsmith is the Stephen Harris professor in the School of Engineering and a professor of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. She co-founded and served as Chief Technical Officer of Plume WiFi and of Quantenna (QTNA), and she currently serves on the Corporate or Technical Advisory Boards of multiple public and private companies. She has also held industry positions at Maxim Technologies, Memorylink Corporation, and AT&T Bell Laboratories. Dr. Goldsmith is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a Fellow of the IEEE and of Stanford, and has received several awards for her work, including the ACM Athena Lecturer Award, the IEEE Comsoc Edwin H. Armstrong Achievement Award, the National Academy of Engineering Gilbreth Lecture Award, the Women in Communications Engineering Mentoring Award, and the Silicon Valley/San Jose Business Journal’s Women of Influence Award. She is author of the book ``Wireless Communications'' and co-author of the books ``MIMO Wireless Communications'' and “Principles of Cognitive Radio,” all published by Cambridge University Press, as well as an inventor on 29 patents. She has also launched and led several multi-university research projects. Her research interests are in information theory and communication theory, and their application to wireless communications and related fields. She received the B.S., M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering from U.C. Berkeley.

Dr. Goldsmith participates actively in committees and conference organization for the IEEE Information Theory and Communications Societies and has served on the Board of Governors for both societies. She has been a Distinguished Lecturer for both societies, served as the President of the IEEE Information Theory Society in 2009, founded and chaired the student committee of the IEEE Information Theory society, and is the founding chair of the IEEE TAB Committee on Diversity and Inclusion. At Stanford she has served as Chair of Stanford’s Faculty Senate and on its Advisory Board, Budget Group, Committee on Research, Planning and Policy Board, Commissions on Graduate and on Undergraduate Education, Faculty Women’s Forum Steering Committee, and Task Force on Women and Leadership.



   SIGMOBILE RockStar Award: Kyle Jamieson 


Kyle Jamieson
Princeton University
Thursday, November 1, 11:50 AM - 12:30 PM

About the Speaker:
Kyle Jamieson

Kyle Jamieson is an Associate Professor in the Department of Computer Science at Princeton University where he leads the PAWS Group, and adjunct Reader of Wireless Systems and Networks at University College London.

His research interests are in all aspects of wireless computer networks, from the basic architecture of the wireless physical layer to high-level security properties. The two main strands of work he has pursued involve bringing phased array signal processing indoors and improving the capacity of wireless networks in a world with many billions of wireless devices, most of which transmit in wireless spectrum that is unplanned by any central authority.

He received the B.S. (2001), M.Eng. (2002), and Ph.D. (2008) degrees in Computer Science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He then received a Starting Investigator fellowship from the European Research Council in 2011, Best Paper awards at USENIX 2013 and CoNEXT 2014, and a Google Faculty Research Award in 2015.



   SIGMOBILE Outstanding Contribution Award: Teresa Meng 


Teresa Meng
Stanford University
Wednesday, October 31, 4:00-5:00 PM

About the Speaker:
Teresa H. Meng

Teresa H. Meng was the Reid Weaver Dennis Professor of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. Her research activities during the first 10 years at Stanford focused on low-power circuit and system design, video signal processing, and wireless communications. In 1999, Dr. Meng took leave from Stanford and founded Atheros Communications, Inc., which developed semiconductor system solutions for wireless network communications products. She returned to Stanford in 2000 to continue her research and teaching at the University.

Dr. Meng has received many awards and honors, including the Distinguished Alumni Award from the Berkeley EECS Department and the Nationnal Taiwan University in 2010, the 2009 IEEE Donald O. Pederson Award, the DEMO Lifetime Achievement Award in 2009, the McKnight Technological Innovations in Neurosciences Award in 2007, the Distinguished Lecturer Award from the IEEE Signal Processing Society in 2004, the Bosch Faculty Scholar Award in 2003, the Innovator of the Year Award by MIT Sloan School eBA in 2002, the CIO 20/20 Vision Award in 2002, named one of the Top 10 Entrepreneurs by Red Herring in 2001, a Best Paper Award from the IEEE Signal Processing Society, an NSF Presidential Young Investigator Award, an ONR Young Investigator Award, and an IBM Faculty Development Award, all in 1989, and the Eli Jury Award from U.C. Berkeley in 1988.

Dr. Meng is the author of one book, several book chapters, and over 200 technical articles in journals and conferences. Dr. Meng is a Fellow of the IEEE and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. She is also a member of the Academia Sinica of Taiwan. She received her M.S. and Ph.D. in EECS from the University of California at Berkeley and her B.S. from National Taiwan University.



   Best Paper Award 

The criteria for a Best Paper Award are a combination of truly transformative and intellectually exciting ideas, combined with a rigorous, scientific experimental verification of those ideas. The MobiCom 2018 selection process takes into account nominations and votes from all PC reviewers, the camera-ready version of the paper, and the community’s reception of the paper at the conference. At the discretion of the conference organizers, multiple papers may receive a Best Paper Award.



   Best Talk Award 

MobiCom 2018 will also have a Best Talk award. This award will take into account solely the presentation of the paper at the conference and the audience’s reception to the talk, including the following Q&A session.






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