MobiCom 2018 / New Delhi, India / Oct-Nov, 2018
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The Rashtrapati Bhavan, New Delhi, India.

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 Keynotes and Awards

 

  Keynote: Monica Lam


Monica Lam
Stanford University

About the Speaker:
Monica Lam

Dr. Monica Lam has been a Professor of Computer Science at Stanford University since 1988, and is the Faculty Director of the Stanford MobiSocial Computing Laboratory. She has made significant contributions to the field of compilers for high-performance machines and open communication platforms for mobile computing. Her research has been widely adopted in industry, including two startups she helped found: Tensilica, a configurable processor core company and Omlet, an open mobile gaming social network company. She leads the Almond open virtual assistant project, which protects privacy and data ownership through user-friendly decentralized systems.

Prof. Lam is an ACM Fellow, has won ACM-SIGSOFT and ACM-PLDI best paper awards, and has published over 150 papers on compilers, computer architecture, operating systems, high-performance computing, databases, security, and HCI. She is an author of the ``Dragon Book'', the definitive text on compiler technology. She received a B.Sc. from University of British Columbia (1980) and a Ph.D. from Carnegie Mellon University (1987).



  Keynote: Kathleen M. Carley


Kathleen M. Carley
Carnegie Mellon University

About the Speaker:
Kathleen M. Carley

Dr. Kathleen M. Carley is a Professor of Computer Science in the Institute for Software Research, IEEE Fellow, and Director of the Center for Computational Analysis of Social and Organizational Systems at Carnegie Mellon University. She joined Carnegie Mellon in 1984 as Assistant Professor Sociology and Information Systems. In 1990 she became Associate Professor of Sociology and Organizations, in 1998 Professor of Sociology, Organizations, and Information Technology, and in 2002, attained her current role as Professor of Computation, Organization, and Society. She is also the CEO of Carley Technologies Inc. aka Netanomics.

Dr. Carley received SB degrees in Economics and in Political Science from M.I.T., and a PhD degree in Sociology from Harvard University. Dr. Carley’s research combines cognitive science, sociology, and computer science to address complex social and organizational issues. Her most notable research contribution was the establishment of Dynamic Network Analysis (DNA) – and the associated theory and methodology for examining large high‐dimensional time variant networks.

Dr. Carley is an IEEE Fellow. In 2018 she received the USGA Academic Award at GEOINT 2018 for her work on geo‐spatially enabled dynamic network analytics. She is the recipient of the Allen Newell award for research excellence. She has served as President of the North American Association for Computational and Organizational Simulation (2003‐2004) and of the Mathematical Sociology Section of the American Sociological Association (1999‐2000). She received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Sociology and Computers Section of the ASA (2001). In 2011 she received the Simmel Award for advances in the area of social networks from INSNA and became a senior member of the IEEE. She has served as a Task Force Member of the Defense Science Board and of Geographic Information Science Panel of the Strategic Command. She has served on multiple National Research Council panels including ones on the military, big data, geo‐spatial analytics, and the decadel survey for the social sciences and was a member of the DHS‐HSSTAC.



  Keynote: Peter T. Kirstein

The Early International Activities in the Arpanet, Its mutation into the Internet, and some further Regional Extensions

Peter T. Kirstein
University College London

Abstract:

This talk will consider some of the activities involved in setting up the International Internet and its precursors. It will consider later efforts in promoting the technology in regions that it had not reached earlier. There will be considered not only the technical development but also the political climate which either encouraged or prevented its take-up. Moreover, the importance of personal networks at many stages of the story will be highlighted.

I will consider why the first Arpanet service node was sited at UCL, how it grew to provide an international heterogeneous interconnection service until the late ‘80s, and how this differed from other European developments. This will include the governance put in place, the role of the Open Systems Interconnection rise and fall in Europe, and the growth of multi-agency support on both sides of the Atlantic.

In parallel with the development of a UK-US service, an International Collaboration Board (ICB) was formed that fostered classified collaborations between certain European and American NATO defense departments. While the ICB was not very significant technically, how its success initiated broader US-European Internet extension will be described.

Our emphasis on application services to the ‘90s will be outlined – message, directory, security, and multimedia conferencing. Finally, we will treat briefly the start of international networking in India around 1990, and the bringing the academics of Central Asia and the Caucasus into the Internet community.

About the Speaker:
Peter T. Kirstein

Dr. Peter T. Kirstein attended UCLA, received a BA from Cambridge, a Ph.D. from Stanford and a DSc from London. He worked four years as an accelerator physicist at CERN, Switzerland, during which he spent six months at Dubna in the Soviet Union. Then he worked four years for the US General Electric Research Centre based in Zurich, Switzerland, concentrating on the computer and communications technology.

In 1967 he joined London U, becoming Professor of Computer Communications Systems in 1970, and setting up the Department of Computer Science at University College London (UCL). He set up the UCL node of the Arpanet in 1973. Unlike the Norwegian node, he provided a National service to the Arpanet connecting in first the fledgling academic network, and then other government sites in defense, fusion, space and the British Library. This was the only European project providing heterogeneous services to the US until the late ‘80s. In parallel, he researched into implementation and development of all levels of the Internet protocols, the Open Systems Interconnecting ones, use of satellites and applications. This allowed him to support his UK-US services even though each community was initially developing differently. As the Europeans moved towards the Internet protocols, his activities migrated to directory services, security and multimedia conferencing as research and service. His recent research has concentrated on the use of IPv6, IoT, and security in applications.

The success of the DARPA satellite activity, involving several European countries, led to the formation of the International Collaboration Board. This fostered unclassified collaborations amongst NATO defense departments under his Chairmanship. The ICB led to the US National Science Foundation asking Kirstein to set up meetings with European academics., leading to much broader internationalization. As part of a Review Committee of the UNDP, he was involved in steering the main Indian research institutes in IT to connect to each other and the Internet; this led to the early phases of ERNET. Later, on a NATO Science for Peace committee, he advised on network facilities in the Caucasus and Central Asia. He proposed a Regional Network connecting their National networks to the European academic network. He became director of what is known as the SILK Project. As a result, these countries became eventually members of the academic Internet community.

He is a Fellow of many Learned Societies, including the UK Royal and US National Academies of Engineering, and the American Academy of Arts and Science. He has received many awards including becoming a Commander of the British Empire and receiving the Marconi, Postel, and CompCom awards, and is an Internet Pioneer in the ISOC Hall of Fame.



  Athena Lecture: Andrea Goldsmith

The Future of Wireless and What It will Enable

Andrea Goldsmith
Stanford University

Abstract:

Wireless technology has enormous potential to change the way we live, work, and play over the next several decades. Future wireless networks will support 100 Gbps communication between people, devices, and the “Internet of Things,” with high reliability and uniform coverage indoors and out. The shortage of spectrum to support such systems will be alleviated by advances in massive MIMO and mmW technology as well as cognitive radios. Wireless technology will also enable smart and energy-efficient homes and buildings, automated highways and skyways, and in-body networks for monitoring, analysis and treatment of medical conditions. Breakthrough energy-efficiency architectures, algorithms and hardware will allow wireless networks to be powered by tiny batteries, energy-harvesting, or over-the-air power transfer. Finally, new communication systems based on biology and chemistry to encode bits will enable a wide range of new micro and macroscale applications. There are many technical challenges that must be overcome in order to make this vision a reality. This talk will describe what the wireless future might look like along with some of the innovations and breakthroughs required to realize this vision.

About the Speaker:
Peter T. Kirstein

Dr. Andrea Goldsmith is the Stephen Harris professor in the School of Engineering and a professor of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. She co-founded and served as Chief Technical Officer of Plume WiFi and of Quantenna (QTNA), and she currently serves on the Corporate or Technical Advisory Boards of multiple public and private companies. She has also held industry positions at Maxim Technologies, Memorylink Corporation, and AT&T Bell Laboratories. Dr. Goldsmith is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a Fellow of the IEEE and of Stanford, and has received several awards for her work, including the ACM Athena Lecturer Award, the IEEE Comsoc Edwin H. Armstrong Achievement Award, the National Academy of Engineering Gilbreth Lecture Award, the Women in Communications Engineering Mentoring Award, and the Silicon Valley/San Jose Business Journal’s Women of Influence Award. She is author of the book ``Wireless Communications'' and co-author of the books ``MIMO Wireless Communications'' and “Principles of Cognitive Radio,” all published by Cambridge University Press, as well as an inventor on 29 patents. She has also launched and led several multi-university research projects. Her research interests are in information theory and communication theory, and their application to wireless communications and related fields. She received the B.S., M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering from U.C. Berkeley.

Dr. Goldsmith participates actively in committees and conference organization for the IEEE Information Theory and Communications Societies and has served on the Board of Governors for both societies. She has been a Distinguished Lecturer for both societies, served as the President of the IEEE Information Theory Society in 2009, founded and chaired the student committee of the IEEE Information Theory society, and is the founding chair of the IEEE TAB Committee on Diversity and Inclusion. At Stanford she has served as Chair of Stanford’s Faculty Senate and on its Advisory Board, Budget Group, Committee on Research, Planning and Policy Board, Commissions on Graduate and on Undergraduate Education, Faculty Women’s Forum Steering Committee, and Task Force on Women and Leadership.






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